Transforming Society as Capitalism Crumbles: Lessons from Brazil’s Peasant Movement

Posted: September 18, 2017 in Uncategorized

Rafael Soriano and Débora Nunes

Débora Nunes, member of the National Directory of Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement, addresses a crowd. (Gustavo Marinho/Landless Workers Movement)

Brazil is facing a profound political and economic crisis since a coup d’etat overturned Dilma Roussef’s government in March of 2016. The new government is unrolling austerity policies that are eroding working families’ political gains by dismantling labor protections and social services and unleashing human rights abuses, including escalating assassinations of peasants and indigenous people. This political context—which shares characteristics with the U.S. climate under Donald Trump—is defined by a crisis of capitalism that resurfaced with the economic meltdown in the Global North that was initiated in 2008.

Rafael Soriano, a member of MST’s Communications Collective, discussed this political climate with Débora Nunes, member of the National Directory of Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement, or Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra, widely known by its Portuguese acronym MST. This social movement of peasants, rural workers and landless families reclaims land rights and struggles for a genuine agrarian reform that would benefit all Brazilians—and strives for deep social and political transformation.

In this interview, Nunes reflects on the danger and potential of this current moment, highlighting opportunities to build alternatives to capitalism as the current economic system flounders.  . .

Source: Transforming Society as Capitalism Crumbles: Lessons from Brazil’s Peasant Movement

Comments
  1. Alan Scott says:

    For sure capitalism is crumbling – but unfortunately it’s still the peasants who do most of the suffering.

  2. The peoples’ never-ending struggle, like our wars, rumbles onwards.

  3. From the article, Rosaliene, it sounds like oppression has increased significantly in Brazil since the coup.

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