Co-housing: One Solution to the Housing Crisis

Posted: October 8, 2017 in Sustainability
Tags: , , , , , ,

Big Cities Cooperative Housing

KCET (2016)

Big Cities Cooperative Housing is a short documentary about co-housing experiments in Seoul South Korea and Lyons France.

In Seoul, where 70% of the population live in high rise apartment buildings, three families have pooled resources to buy a three story house. In addition to communal cooking and social space, each family has private living space. There is also a communal vegetable garden.

The “vertical village in Lyon was first build in 2005 by a group of families seeking a non-materialistic lifestyle – who found themselves priced out of the property market. The first housing cooperative in France, it’s been the inspiration for many similar co-housing projects in Europe and Quebec, as well as French legal framework to recognize cooperative ownership.

In France, removal of residential property from the speculation-ridden real estate market has been an important benefit of co-housing.

The video can be viewed for free at Big Cities Cooperative Housing

Comments
  1. This sounds interesting. But I do hope fire safety is top priority in the high rise buildings after the terrible tragedy in Londons Grendel Tower!

    Sent by Brenda Kimmins

    • Excellent point, heavenhappens. In my experience, this is the best part of people who are most effective assuming control of important aspects of their life – such as housing. You can be pretty sure, safety will be a much higher priority than for a corporation that is merely providing housing to collect the profits it creates.

  2. Mocking J Anthony says:

    Thanks for sharing! Agreed 100%

    As a peer advocate in homeless struggle, peer-run co-housing is also my preferred strategy for helping to address the diverse interconnected issues homeless populations face.

    The power of peer support that can happen in a co-operative house, organized/built and run by people with shared struggle, is just as(if not more) important as the housing itself, to help address related issues that lead to and/or maintain homelessness.

    For example:

    peer run sober housing, or harm reduction, treatment and recovery housing.

    peer run homes for abused and battered women

    peer run homes for lgbtq youth

    peer run homes for disabled workers

    peer run homes for refugee families

    or anything really.

    • It sounds like we’re pretty much on the same page with this, Mocking. Cohousing is one of the best exercises in direct democracy I know. So are savings pools. Here in New Zealand we have several – enabling many of us to lend and borrow money without being exploited by banks.

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