Banned in Brazil

Posted: November 30, 2016 in Things that aren't what they seem
Tags: , , , , , ,

send-a-bullet

Manda Bala (Send a Bullet)

Directed by Jason Kohn (2007)

Film Review

Maori TV showed this 2007 documentary two nights ago – a timely choice in view of Brazilian legislative corruption that culminated in the illegal impeachment of democratically elected president Dilma Rousseff two months ago.

Send a Bullet is a horrifying account of class warfare, extreme wealth disparity and extreme violence in Sao Palo Brazil. The film has been banned in Brazil.

According to the filmmakers Sao Paulo, with a population of 20 million, experiences one kidnapping every single day. Ruthless outlaws routinely cut off ears and fingers to send with their ransom demands. The documentary profiles a Brazilian plastic surgeon who makes his living reattaching the severed ears of kidnap victims.

Because the government offers virtually no protection against kidnapping, wealthy Sao Paulo residents hire bodyguards, drive bullet proof cars and take special classes to protect themselves from kidnapping. Many rely on helicopters as the only safe method of transport.

The film also explores how organized crime has deeply infiltrated the Brazilian government, in large part because serving officials are exempt from prosecution in civilian courts.

Although the documentary is nine years old, a quick search of the Internet suggests that Brazil’s kidnapping epidemic persists unabated. In June gunmen kidnapped a New Zealand Jiu-Jitsu champion in the lead-up to the Olympics and in August the mother-in-law of the head of Formula One auto racing. Visitors to Brazil should consult the Globe Media website on the best way to protect themselves against kidnapping: Safety in Brazil

The only complete subtitled version of Send a Bullet I could find is at the Maori TV website: Send a Bullet

 

Comments
  1. Dr. Bramhall, during the years I lived in Fortaleza, capital of the Northeast State of Ceara, kidnapping was a common occurrence in several large cities across Brazil. In Fortaleza, we faced the danger of ‘flash kidnapping’ at ATM machines, where you could be kidnapped and taken to several ATM machines across the city to withdraw the maximum limit permitted on your account. To this day, I’m wary about using ATM machines in high-risk areas.

  2. rudolfalbert says:

    Reblogged this on rudolfwordpressblog.

  3. How utterly horrifying, Rosaliene. That sounds like living in a permanent war zone.

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